As per the GOI circular on price capping of Orthopaedic Knee implant by NPPA(National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority), new prices of knee implants have been implemented effective 16th August 2017. For details on knee implant pricing across our hospitals. CLICK HERE | As per GOI’s circular dated 02nd April 2018 on price-capping of stents by NPPA(National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority), new prices of coronary stents are revised with effect from 01st April, 2018. For details on stent pricing.CLICK HERE
Request an Appointment

Barrett's esophagus

In Barrett's esophagus, tissue in the tube connecting your mouth and stomach (esophagus) is replaced by tissue similar to the intestinal lining.

Barrett's esophagus is most often diagnosed in people who have long-term gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) — a chronic regurgitation of acid from the stomach into the lower esophagus. Only a small percentage of people with GERD will develop Barrett's esophagus.

Barrett's esophagus is associated with an increased risk of developing esophageal cancer. Although the risk is small, it's important to have regular checkups for precancerous cells. If precancerous cells are discovered, they can be treated to prevent esophageal cancer.

Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications

The tissue changes that characterize Barrett's esophagus cause no symptoms. The signs and symptoms that you experience are generally due to GERD and may include:

  • Frequent heartburn
  • Difficulty swallowing food
  • Less commonly, chest pain

Many people with Barrett's esophagus have no signs or symptoms.

When to see a doctor

If you've had trouble with heartburn and acid reflux for more than five years, ask your doctor about your risk of Barrett's esophagus.

Seek immediate help if you:

  • Have chest pain, which may be a symptom of a heart attack
  • Have difficulty swallowing
  • Are vomiting red blood or blood that looks like coffee grounds
  • Are passing black, tarry or bloody stools

The exact cause of Barrett's esophagus isn't known. Most people with Barrett's esophagus have long-standing GERD. In GERD, stomach contents wash back into the esophagus, damaging esophagus tissue. As the esophagus tries to heal itself, the cells can change to the type of cells found in Barrett's esophagus.

However, some people diagnosed with Barrett's esophagus have never experienced heartburn or acid reflux. It's not clear what causes Barrett's esophagus in these people.

Factors that increase your risk of Barrett's esophagus include:

  • Chronic heartburn and acid reflux. Having GERD for more than five years or having GERD that requires regular medication and being older than age 50 can increase the risk of Barrett's esophagus. Your risk may be further increased if you are age 30 or younger when chronic GERD develops.
  • Age. Barrett's esophagus can occur at any age but is more common in older adults.
  • Being a man. Men are more likely to develop Barrett's esophagus.
  • Being white. White people have a greater risk of the disease than do people of other races.
  • Being overweight. Body fat around your abdomen further increases your risk.
  • Smoking.

People with Barrett's esophagus have an increased risk of esophageal cancer. The risk is small, especially in people whose lab tests show no precancerous changes (dysplasia) in their esophagus cells. Most people with Barrett's esophagus will never develop esophageal cancer.

© 1998-2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved. Terms of use