IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Conjoined twins

Conjoined twins are two babies that are born physically connected to each other.

Conjoined twins develop when an early embryo partially separates to form two individuals. Although two fetuses will develop from this embryo, they will remain physically connected — most often at the chest, pelvis or buttocks. Conjoined twins may also share one or more internal organs.

Most conjoined twins are stillborn or die shortly after birth. Some surviving conjoined twins can be surgically separated. The success of surgery to separate conjoined twins depends on where the twins are joined and how many and which organs are shared, as well as on the experience and skill of the surgical team.


Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications

There aren't any specific signs and symptoms that indicate a woman is carrying conjoined twins. As with other twin pregnancies, the uterus may grow more rapidly than expected, and mothers of twins may also have more fatigue, nausea and vomiting early in the pregnancy.

How twins are joined

Conjoined twins are usually classified according to where they're joined, and there are many ways that conjoined twins may be connected. Some of the more common ways include:

  • Joined at the chest. One of the most common of conjoined twins, thoracopagus twins are joined at the chest. They often have a shared heart and may also share one liver and upper intestine.
  • Joined near the bellybutton. Omphalopagus twins are joined near the bellybutton. Many omphalopagus twins share the liver, and some share the lower part of the small intestine (ileum) and colon. They generally do not, however, share a heart.
  • Joined at the base of the spine. Pygopagus twins are joined at the base of the spine and commonly face away from one another. Some pygopagus twins share the lower gastrointestinal tract, and a few share the genital and urinary organs.
  • Joined at the pelvis. Ischiopagus twins are joined at the pelvis. Many ischiopagus twins share the lower gastrointestinal tract, as well as the liver and genital and urinary tract organs. Each twin may have two legs or in some cases, one pair of legs and even a fused leg, though that's uncommon.
  • Joined at the head. Craniopagus twins are joined at the head. Craniopagus twins share a portion of the skull, and possibly brain tissue. This sharing may involve the cerebral cortex — the part of the brain that plays a central role in memory, language and perception.

In rare cases, twins may be asymmetrically conjoined, with one twin smaller and less fully formed than the other (parasitic twins).


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