Entropion (en-TROH-pe-on) is a condition in which your eyelid turns inward so that your eyelashes and skin rub against the eye surface, causing irritation and discomfort.

When you have entropion, your eyelid may be turned in all the time or it may only turn inward when you blink forcibly or tightly squeeze your eyelids shut. Entropion occurs most often in older adults, and it generally affects only your lower eyelid.

Artificial tears and lubricating ointments can help relieve symptoms of entropion, but you'll often need surgery to correct it. Left untreated, entropion can cause damage to the clear part of your eye (cornea), eye infections and vision loss.

Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Prevention

The symptoms of entropion result from the friction of your eyelashes and outer eyelid against the surface of your eye. You may have signs and symptoms such as:

  • The feeling that there's something in your eye
  • Redness of the white part of your eye
  • Eye irritation or pain
  • Sensitivity to light and wind
  • Watery eyes (excessive tearing)
  • Mucous discharge and eyelid crusting
  • Decreased vision

When to seek medical advice

If you feel like you constantly have something in your eye or you notice that some of your eyelashes seem to be turning in toward your eye, make an appointment to see your doctor for an evaluation. If you leave entropion untreated for too long, it can cause permanent damage to your eye. Be sure to use artificial tears and eye-moisturizing ointments to protect your eye before your appointment.

If you know that you have entropion, be alert for symptoms of cornea exposure or ulcers, including rapidly increasing redness, pain, light sensitivity or decreasing vision. If you experience any of these vision-threatening signs and symptoms, seek immediate care in an ophthalmologist's office or an emergency room.

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