IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Intracranial hematoma

An intracranial hematoma occurs when a blood vessel ruptures within your brain or between your skull and your brain. The collection of blood (hematoma) compresses your brain tissue.

An intracranial hematoma may occur because the fluid that surrounds your brain can't absorb the force of a sudden blow or a quick stop. Then your brain may slide forcefully against the inner wall of your skull and become bruised.

Although some head injuries — such as one that causes only a brief lapse of consciousness (concussion) — can be minor, an intracranial hematoma is potentially life-threatening and often requires immediate treatment.

An intracranial hematoma often, but not always, requires surgery to remove the blood.


Symptoms Causes Prevention

Signs and symptoms of an intracranial hematoma may be evident right after a blow to your head, or they may take several weeks or longer to appear. You may seem fine after a head injury, a period called the lucid interval. However, with time, pressure on your brain increases, producing some or all of the following signs and symptoms:

  • Increasing headache
  • Vomiting
  • Drowsiness and progressive loss of consciousness
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Unequal pupil size
  • Slurred speech
  • Increased blood pressure

As more blood fills your brain or the narrow space between your brain and skull, other signs and symptoms may become apparent, such as:

  • Lethargy
  • Seizures
  • Unconsciousness

When to see a doctor

An intracranial hematoma can be life-threatening. Emergency medical treatment often is necessary.

Seek immediate medical attention after a blow to the head if:

  • You lose consciousness
  • You have any of the signs and symptoms that could indicate an intracranial hematoma

Signs and symptoms of intracranial hematoma may not be immediately apparent, so watch for subsequent physical, mental and emotional changes. For example, if someone seems fine after a blow to the head and can talk but then becomes unconscious, seek immediate medical care.

Also, even if you feel fine, ask someone to keep an eye on you. You may have memory loss after a blow to your head, so you may forget about it eventually. Someone you tell may be more likely to recognize the warning signs and get you prompt medical attention.


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