IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Mitral valve stenosis

Mitral valve stenosis — or mitral stenosis — is a narrowing of the heart's mitral valve. This abnormal valve doesn't open properly, blocking blood flow into the main pumping chamber of your heart (left ventricle). Mitral valve stenosis can make you tired and short of breath, among other problems.

The main cause of mitral valve stenosis is an infection called rheumatic fever, which is related to strep infections. Rheumatic fever — now rare in the United States, but still common in developing countries — can scar the mitral valve. Left untreated, mitral valve stenosis can lead to serious heart complications.


Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Prevention

You may feel fine with mitral valve stenosis, or you may have minimal symptoms for decades. However, mild problems can suddenly worsen. See your doctor if you develop:

  • Shortness of breath, especially with exertion or when you lie down
  • Fatigue, especially during increased physical activity
  • Swollen feet or legs
  • Heart palpitations — sensations of a rapid, fluttering heartbeat
  • Dizziness or fainting
  • Heavy coughing, sometimes with blood-tinged sputum
  • Chest discomfort or chest pain
  • Severe headache, trouble speaking or other symptoms of stroke

Mitral valve stenosis symptoms may appear or worsen anytime your heart rate increases, such as during exercise. An episode of rapid heartbeats may accompany these symptoms. Or they may be triggered by pregnancy or other body stress, such as an infection.

In mitral valve stenosis, pressure that builds up in the heart is then sent back to the lungs, resulting in fluid buildup (congestion) and shortness of breath.

Symptoms of mitral valve stenosis most often appear in between the ages of 30 and 50 in developed nations, but they can occur at any age — even during childhood.

Mitral valve stenosis may also produce signs that your doctor will find during your examination. These may include:

  • Heart murmur
  • Fluid buildup in the lungs
  • Irregular heart rhythms (arrhythmias)

When to see a doctor

Call your doctor for an immediate appointment if you develop fatigue or shortness of breath during physical activity, heart palpitations or chest pain.

If you've been diagnosed with mitral valve stenosis but haven't had symptoms, talk to your doctor about follow-up evaluations.


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