IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Multiple system atrophy (MSA)

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rare neurological disorder that impairs your body's involuntary (autonomic) functions, including blood pressure, heart rate, bladder function and digestion.

Formerly called Shy-Drager syndrome, the condition shares many Parkinson's disease-like symptoms, such as slowness of movement, muscle rigidity and poor balance.

Multiple system atrophy is a degenerative disease that develops in adulthood, usually in the 50s or 60s.

Treatment for MSA includes medications and lifestyle changes to help manage symptoms. The condition progresses gradually and eventually leads to death.


Symptoms Causes Complications

Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is so named because its signs and symptoms affect multiple parts of your body. Previously called Shy-Drager syndrome, MSA is classified by two types: parkinsonian and cerebellar, depending on which types of symptoms predominate at the time of evaluation.

Parkinsonian type

Predominant signs and symptoms are those of Parkinson's disease, such as:

  • Rigid muscles and difficulty bending your arms and legs
  • Slow movement (bradykinesia)
  • Tremors (rare in MSA compared with classic Parkinson's disease)
  • Impaired posture and balance

Cerebellar type

Predominant signs and symptoms are lack of muscle coordination (ataxia). Signs and symptoms may include:

  • Impairment of movement and coordination, such as unsteady gait and loss of balance
  • Slurred, slow or low-volume speech (dysarthria)
  • Visual disturbances, such as blurred or double vision and difficulty focusing your eyes
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia) or chewing

General signs and symptoms

In addition, the primary sign of multiple system atrophy is:

  • Postural (orthostatic) hypotension, a form of low blood pressure that makes you feel dizzy or lightheaded, or even faint, when you stand up from sitting or lying down.

You also can develop dangerously high blood pressure levels while lying down.

People with multiple system atrophy may have other difficulties with body functions that occur involuntarily (autonomic), including:

Urinary and bowel dysfunction

  • Constipation
  • Loss of bladder or bowel control (incontinence)

Sweating abnormalities

  • A reduction in the production of perspiration, tears and saliva
  • Impaired control of body temperature, often causing cold hands or feet as well as heat intolerance due to impaired sweating

Sleep disorders

  • Agitated sleep due to "acting out" one's dreams
  • Abnormal breathing at night

Sexual dysfunction

  • Inability to achieve or maintain an erection (impotence)
  • Loss of libido

Cardiovascular problems

  • Irregular heartbeat

Psychiatric problems

  • Difficulty controlling emotions

When to see a doctor

If you develop any of the signs and symptoms associated with multiple system atrophy, see your doctor for an evaluation and diagnosis. If you've already been diagnosed with the condition, contact your doctor if new symptoms occur or if existing symptoms worsen.


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