Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is a term used to describe the accumulation of fat in the liver of people who drink little or no alcohol.

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is common and, for most people, causes no signs and symptoms and no complications.

But in some people with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, the fat that accumulates can cause inflammation and scarring in the liver. This more serious form of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is sometimes called nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

At its most severe, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease can progress to liver failure.

Symptoms Causes Risk factors Prevention

Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease usually causes no signs and symptoms. When it does, they may include:

  • Fatigue
  • Pain in the upper right abdomen
  • Weight loss

When to see a doctor

Make an appointment with your doctor if you have persistent signs and symptoms that cause you concern.

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