IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Porphyria

Porphyria (poor-FEAR-e-uh) refers to a group of disorders that result from a buildup of natural chemicals that produce porphyrin in your body. Porphyrins are essential for the function of hemoglobin — a protein in your red blood cells that links to porphyrin, binds iron, and carries oxygen to your organs and tissue. High levels of porphyrins can cause significant problems.

Porphyria mainly affects your nervous system, skin and other organs. The signs and symptoms of porphyria can vary, depending on the specific type and severity. Porphyria is usually inherited — one or both parents pass along an abnormal gene to their child. But in some types of porphyria, environmental factors may trigger the development of symptoms.

Treatment depends on the type of porphyria you have. Although porphyria usually can't be cured, certain lifestyle changes may help you manage it.


Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Prevention

There are two general categories of porphyria — acute, which mainly affects the nervous system, and cutaneous, which mainly affects the skin. Some types of porphyria have both nervous system symptoms and skin symptoms, and others have mainly one or the other.

Acute porphyrias

Acute porphyrias include forms of the disease that typically cause nervous system symptoms, which appear quickly and can be life-threatening. Acute porphyria attacks are rare before puberty and after menopause in women. Symptoms may last one to two weeks and usually improve slowly after the attack.

Possible signs and symptoms of acute porphyria include:

  • Severe abdominal pain
  • Swelling of the abdomen (abdominal distention)
  • Pain in your chest, legs or back
  • Constipation or diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Heartbeat you can feel (palpitations)
  • High blood pressure
  • Anxiety or restlessness
  • Seizures
  • Mental changes, such as confusion, hallucinations, disorientation or paranoia
  • Breathing problems
  • Muscle pain, tingling, numbness, weakness or paralysis
  • Red or brown urine

Cutaneous porphyrias

Cutaneous porphyrias include forms of the disease that cause skin symptoms as a result of oversensitivity to sunlight, but these forms don't usually affect your nervous system. Attacks may last for several days. With some forms, signs and symptoms may start during infancy or childhood.

As a result of sun exposure, you may experience:

  • Sensitivity to the sun and sometimes artificial light, causing burning pain
  • Sudden painful skin redness (erythema) and swelling (edema)
  • Blisters that take weeks to heal
  • Itching
  • Fragile skin
  • Scars or skin color changes from healing blisters
  • Increased hair growth
  • Red or brown urine

When to see a doctor

Many signs and symptoms of porphyria are similar to those of other, more common conditions. This can make it difficult to know if you're having an attack of porphyria. Any of the following symptoms should prompt you to seek immediate medical attention:

  • Severe abdominal pain, but sometimes pain in your chest, legs or back, accompanied by constipation, vomiting and sometimes diarrhea
  • Sensitivity to the sun and sometimes artificial light, causing burning pain and sudden painful skin blistering, redness (erythema) and swelling (edema)
  • Red or brown urine

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