IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Primary progressive aphasia

Primary progressive aphasia (uh-FAY-zhuh) is a rare nervous system (neurological) syndrome that impairs language capabilities. People with primary progressive aphasia may have trouble expressing their thoughts and comprehending or finding words.

Symptoms of primary progressive aphasia begin gradually, sometimes before age 65, and tend to worsen over time. People with primary progressive aphasia can become mute and may eventually lose the ability to understand written or spoken language.

People with primary progressive aphasia may continue caring for themselves and participating in daily life activities for several years after the disorder's onset, as the condition progresses slowly.

Primary progressive aphasia is a type of frontotemporal degeneration, a cluster of related disorders that originate in the frontal or temporal lobes of the brain.


Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications

Primary progressive aphasia symptoms may vary by individual, depending on which portion of the brain's language center is involved.

Primary progressive aphasia has three types, which cause different symptoms.

Semantic variant primary progressive aphasia


In this condition, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Difficulty comprehending spoken or written language, particularly single words
  • Difficulty comprehending word meanings
  • Difficulty naming objects

Lopogenic variant primary progressive aphasia


In this condition, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Difficulty retrieving correct words in speech
  • Frequent pauses in your speech while searching for words
  • Slow speech
  • Difficulty repeating phrases or sentences

Nonfluent-agrammatic variant primary progressive aphasia


In this condition, you may experience symptoms such as:

  • Difficulty speaking
  • Hesitant, halting speech
  • Making errors in speech sounds
  • Difficulty understanding sentences
  • Using grammar incorrectly

Symptoms may vary depending on the speaking situation and the type of primary progressive aphasia. For example, a person may need to pause frequently to find words during a conversation requiring a high level of precision but then have no pauses when exchanging small talk. Reading and writing also are usually affected.


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