IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Progeria

Progeria (pro-JEER-e-uh), also known as Hutchinson-Gilford syndrome, is an extremely rare, progressive genetic disorder that causes children to age rapidly, beginning in their first two years of life.

Children with progeria generally appear normal at birth. During the first year, signs and symptoms, such as slow growth and hair loss, begin to appear.

Heart problems or strokes are the eventual cause of death in most children with progeria. The average life expectancy for a child with progeria is about 13 years, but some with the disease die younger and some live 20 years or longer.

There's no cure for progeria, but ongoing research shows some promise for treatment.


Symptoms Causes Complications

Usually within the first year of life, growth of a child with progeria slows markedly, but motor development and intelligence remain normal.

Signs and symptoms of this progressive disorder include a distinctive appearance:

  • Slowed growth, with below-average height and weight
  • Narrowed face, small lower jaw, thin lips and beaked nose
  • Head disproportionately large for face
  • Prominent eyes and incomplete closure of the eyelids
  • Hair loss, including eyelashes and eyebrows
  • Thinning, spotty, wrinkled skin
  • Visible veins
  • High-pitched voice

Signs and symptoms also include health issues:

  • Hardening and tightening of skin on trunk and extremities (similar to scleroderma)
  • Delayed and abnormal tooth formation
  • Some hearing loss
  • Loss of fat under the skin and loss of muscle mass
  • Fragile bones
  • Stiff joints
  • Hip dislocation
  • Insulin resistance
  • Severe progressive heart and blood vessel (cardiovascular) disease

When to see a doctor

Call for an appointment with your doctor if your child does not appear to be growing or developing normally, including problems with hair loss, skin changes or slowed growth.


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