Pulmonary valve stenosis

Pulmonary valve stenosis is a condition in which a deformity on or near your pulmonary valve, the valve that influences the blood flow from your heart to your lungs, slows the blood flow. Adults occasionally have the condition as a complication of another illness, but mostly, pulmonary valve stenosis develops before birth as a congenital heart defect.

Pulmonary valve stenosis ranges from mild and without symptoms to severe. Mild pulmonary stenosis doesn't usually worsen over time, but moderate and severe cases may worsen and require surgery. Fortunately, treatment is highly successful, and most people with pulmonary valve stenosis can expect to lead normal lives.

Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications

Pulmonary valve stenosis signs and symptoms vary, depending on the extent of the obstruction. People with mild pulmonary stenosis usually don't have symptoms. Those with more significant stenosis often first notice symptoms while exercising.

Pulmonary valve stenosis signs and symptoms may include:

  • Heart murmur — an abnormal whooshing sound heard using a stethoscope, caused by turbulent blood flow
  • Shortness of breath, especially during exertion
  • Chest pain
  • Loss of consciousness (fainting)
  • Fatigue

When to see a doctor

Talk to your doctor if you or your child has:

  • Shortness of breath
  • Fainting
  • Chest pain

If you have pulmonary stenosis or another heart problem, prompt evaluation and treatment can help reduce your risk of complications.

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