IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Retractile testicle

A retractile testicle is a testicle that may move back and forth between the scrotum and the groin. When the retractile testicle is residing in the groin, it may be easily guided by hand into its proper position in the scrotum — the bag of skin hanging behind the penis — during a physical examination.

For most boys, the problem of a retractile testicle goes away sometime before or during puberty, the time when an out-of-place testicle moves to its correct location in the scrotum and stays there permanently.

About a quarter of the time, the retractile testicle stays up in the groin and is no longer movable. When this happens, the condition is called an ascending testicle.


Symptoms Causes Complications

Testicles form in the abdomen during fetal development. During the final months of development, the testicles gradually descend into the scrotum. If your son has a retractile testicle, the testicle originally descended as it should, but then it didn't remain in place.

Signs and symptoms of a retractile testicle include the following:

  • The testicle may be moved by hand from the groin into the scrotum and won't immediately retreat to the groin.
  • It may spontaneously appear in the scrotum and remain there for a time.
  • It may spontaneously disappear again for a time.

The movement of the testicle almost always occurs without pain or discomfort. Therefore, a retractile testicle is noticed only when it is no longer seen or felt in the scrotum.

The position of one testicle is usually independent of the position of the other one. For example, a boy may have one normal testicle and one retractile testicle.

Retractile testicle is different from undescended testicle (cryptorchidism). The undescended testicle is one that never entered the scrotum. If a doctor attempted to guide an undescended testicle, it would cause discomfort or pain.

When to see a doctor

During regular well-baby checkups and annual childhood checkups, your son's doctor examines your son's testicles to determine if they're descended and appropriately developed. If you believe that your son has a retractile or ascending testicle — or have other concerns about the development of his testicles — see his doctor. He or she will tell you how often to schedule checkups to monitor changes in the condition.

If your son experiences pain in the groin or testicles, see your son's doctor immediately.


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