Retrograde ejaculation

Retrograde ejaculation occurs when semen enters the bladder instead of emerging through the penis during orgasm. Although you still reach sexual climax, you may ejaculate very little or no semen. This is sometimes called a dry orgasm. Retrograde ejaculation isn't harmful, but it can cause male infertility. Treatment for retrograde ejaculation is generally only needed to restore fertility.

Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Prevention

Retrograde ejaculation doesn't affect your ability to get an erection or have an orgasm — but when you climax, semen goes into your bladder instead of coming out of your penis. Retrograde ejaculation signs and symptoms include:

  • Dry orgasms, orgasms in which you ejaculate very little or no semen out of your penis
  • Urine that is cloudy after orgasm (because it contains semen)
  • Inability to get a woman pregnant (male infertility)

When to see a doctor

Retrograde ejaculation isn't harmful and requires treatment only if you're attempting to father a child. However, if you have dry orgasms, see your doctor to be sure your condition isn't caused by an underlying problem that needs attention.

If you and your partner have had regular, unprotected intercourse for a year or longer and have been unable to conceive, see your doctor. Retrograde ejaculation may be the cause of your problem if you ejaculate very little or no semen.

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