IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Reye's syndrome

Reye's (Ryes) syndrome is a rare but serious condition that causes swelling in the liver and brain. Reye's syndrome most often affects children and teenagers recovering from a viral infection, most commonly the flu or chickenpox.

Signs and symptoms such as confusion, seizures and loss of consciousness require emergency treatment. Early diagnosis and treatment of Reye's syndrome can save a child's life.

Aspirin has been linked with Reye's syndrome, so use caution when giving aspirin to children or teenagers. Though aspirin is approved for use in children older than age 2, children and teenagers recovering from chickenpox or flu-like symptoms should never take aspirin. Talk to your doctor if you have concerns.


Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Prevention

In Reye's syndrome, a child's blood sugar level typically drops while the levels of ammonia and acidity in his or her blood rise. At the same time, the liver may swell and develop fatty deposits. Swelling may also occur in the brain, which can cause seizures, convulsions or loss of consciousness.

The signs and symptoms of Reye's syndrome typically appear about three to five days after the onset of a viral infection, such as the flu (influenza) or chickenpox, or an upper respiratory infection, such as a cold.

Initial signs and symptoms

For children younger than age 2, the first signs of Reye's syndrome may include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Rapid breathing

For older children and teenagers, early signs and symptoms may include:

  • Persistent or continuous vomiting
  • Unusual sleepiness or lethargy

Additional signs and symptoms

As the condition progresses, signs and symptoms may become more serious, including:

  • Irritable, aggressive or irrational behavior
  • Confusion, disorientation or hallucinations
  • Weakness or paralysis in the arms and legs
  • Seizures
  • Excessive lethargy
  • Decreased level of consciousness

These signs and symptoms require emergency treatment.

When to see a doctor

Early diagnosis and treatment of Reye's syndrome can save a child's life. If you suspect that your child has Reye's syndrome, it's important to act quickly.

Seek emergency medical help if your child:

  • Has seizures or convulsions
  • Loses consciousness

Contact your child's doctor if your child experiences the following after a bout with the flu or chickenpox:

  • Vomits repeatedly
  • Becomes unusually sleepy or lethargic
  • Has sudden behavior changes

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