IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Ringworm (scalp)

Ringworm of the scalp (tinea capitis) is a fungal infection of the scalp and hair shafts. The signs and symptoms of ringworm of the scalp may vary, but it usually appears as itchy, scaly, bald patches on the head.

Ringworm of the scalp, a highly contagious infection, is most common in toddlers and school-age children.

Treatment for ringworm of the scalp includes medications taken by mouth to kill the fungi, as well as medicated shampoos that may lessen the spread of infection.

Some cases of ringworm of the scalp result in severe inflammation at the site of infection that may cause scarring or permanent hair loss.


Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications Prevention

The signs and symptoms of ringworm of the scalp include:

  • One or more round patches of scaly skin where the hair has broken off at or just above the scalp
  • Patches that slowly expand or enlarge
  • Scaly, gray or reddened areas
  • Patches that have small black dots where the hair has broken off at the scalp
  • Brittle or fragile hair that easily pulls out
  • Tender or painful areas on the scalp

When to see a doctor

Several conditions affecting the scalp may have a similar appearance. See your child's doctor if your child has any hair loss, scaling or itchiness of the scalp, or other unusual appearance of the scalp. It's important to get an accurate diagnosis and prompt, appropriate treatment.


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