IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Tourette syndrome

Tourette (too-RET) syndrome is a nervous system (neurological) disorder that starts in childhood. It involves unusual repetitive movements or unwanted sounds that can't be controlled (tics). For instance, you may repeatedly blink your eyes, shrug your shoulders or jerk your head. In some cases, you might unintentionally blurt out offensive words.

Signs and symptoms of Tourette syndrome typically show up between ages 2 and 12, with the average being around 7 years of age. Males are about three to four times more likely than females to develop Tourette syndrome.

Although there's no cure, you can live a normal life span with Tourette syndrome, and many people with Tourette syndrome don't need treatment when symptoms aren't troublesome. Symptoms of Tourette syndrome often lessen or become quiet and controlled after the teen years.


Symptoms Causes Risk factors Complications

Tics — sudden, brief, intermittent movements or sounds — are the hallmark sign of Tourette syndrome. Symptoms range from mild to severe. Severe symptoms may significantly interfere with communication, daily functioning and quality of life.

Tics are classified as either:

  • Simple tics, which are sudden, brief and repetitive, involving a limited number of muscle groups
  • Complex tics, which are distinct, coordinated patterns of movements that involve several muscle groups

Tics involving movement (motor tics) — often facial tics, such as blinking — usually begin before vocal tics do. But the spectrum of tics that people experience is diverse, and there's no typical case.

Common motor tics seen in Tourette syndrome
Simple ticsComplex tics
Eye blinking Touching the nose
Head jerking Touching other people
Shoulder shrugging Smelling objects
Eye darting Obscene gesturing
Finger flexing Flapping the arms
Sticking the tongue out Hopping
Common vocal tics seen in Tourette syndrome
Simple ticsComplex tics
Hiccuping Using different tones of voice
Yelling Repeating one's own words or phrases
Throat clearing Repeating others' words or phrases
Barking Using vulgar, obscene or swear words

In addition, if you have Tourette syndrome, your tics may:

  • Vary in type, frequency and severity
  • Worsen if you're ill, stressed, anxious, tired or excited
  • Occur during sleep
  • Evolve into different tics over time
  • Worsen during teenage years and improve during the transition into adulthood

Before the onset of motor or vocal tics, you'll likely experience an urge called a premonitory urge. A premonitory urge is an uncomfortable bodily sensation, such as an itch, a tingle or tension. Expression of the tic brings relief.

With great effort, some people with Tourette syndrome can temporarily stop a tic or hold back tics until they find a place where it's less disruptive to express them.

When to see a doctor

If you notice your child displaying involuntary movements or sounds, schedule an appointment with your pediatrician. Not all tics indicate Tourette syndrome.

Many children develop tics lasting a few weeks or months that go away on their own. But whenever a child shows unusual behavior, it's important to have a medical evaluation to identify the cause and rule out serious health problems.


© 1998-2015 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research (MFMER). All rights reserved. Terms of use