Canalith repositioning procedure

The canalith repositioning procedure can help relieve benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), a condition in which you have brief, but intense, episodes of dizziness that occur when you move your head. Vertigo usually comes from a problem with the part of the inner ear responsible for balance (vestibular labyrinth). BPPV occurs when tiny particles called otoconia in one part of your inner ear break loose and fall into the canals of your inner ear.

The canalith repositioning procedure can move the otoconia to a part of your ear where they won't cause dizziness. Performed in your doctor's office and at home, the canalith repositioning procedure consists of several simple head maneuvers. The procedure is quite effective, relieving vertigo in 80 percent or more of individuals after one or two treatments. However, the problem may recur.

Why it's done Risks How you prepare What you can expect Results

The canalith repositioning procedure is performed to move the symptom-causing otoconia from the fluid-filled semicircular canals of your inner ear into a tiny bag-like open area (vestibule) that houses one of the otolith organs (utricle) in your ear. Once there, these particles won't cause vertigo and will likely be reabsorbed by bodily fluids in your ear.

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