Cardioversion is a medical procedure done to restore a normal heart rhythm for people who have certain types of abnormal heartbeats (arrhythmias).

Cardioversion is most often done by sending electric shocks to your heart through electrodes placed on your chest. Occasionally, your doctor may perform cardioversion using only medications to restore your heart's rhythm.

Cardioversion is usually a scheduled procedure that's performed in a hospital, and you should be able to go home the same day as your procedure. For most people, cardioversion quickly restores a normal heart rhythm.

Why it's done Risks How you prepare What you can expect Results

Cardioversion can correct a heartbeat that's too fast (tachycardia) or irregular (fibrillation). Cardioversion is usually used to treat people who have atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. These are conditions in which the electrical signals that cause your heart to beat in a regular rate and rhythm don't properly travel through the upper chambers of your heart.

Cardioversion is performed when your heart is beating ineffectively. It's different from defibrillation, an emergency procedure that's performed when your heart stops or quivers uselessly. Defibrillation delivers more powerful shocks to the heart to correct its rhythm. Cardioversion is usually scheduled in advance but is sometimes done in emergency situations.

Cardioversion is usually done with electric shocks, administered through electrodes attached to your chest, while you're sedated. Electric cardioversion takes less time than cardioversion done solely with medications, and your doctor can instantly see if the procedure has restored a normal heartbeat.

If your doctor recommends cardioversion with medications to restore your heart's rhythm, you won't receive electric shocks to your heart.

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