As per GOI’s circular on price-capping of stents by NPPA(National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority), new prices of coronary stents have been implemented effective 14th February, 2017. For details on stent pricing, across our hospitals. CLICK HERE

Complete blood count (CBC)

A complete blood count (CBC) is a blood test used to evaluate your overall health and detect a wide range of disorders, including anemia, infection and leukemia.

A complete blood count test measures several components and features of your blood, including:

  • Red blood cells, which carry oxygen
  • White blood cells, which fight infection
  • Hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells
  • Hematocrit, the proportion of red blood cells to the fluid component, or plasma, in your blood
  • Platelets, which help with blood clotting

Abnormal increases or decreases in cell counts as revealed in a complete blood count may indicate that you have an underlying medical condition that calls for further evaluation.


Why it's done How you prepare What you can expect Results

A complete blood count is a common blood test that's done for a variety of reasons:

  • To review your overall health. Your doctor may recommend a complete blood count as part of a routine medical examination to monitor your general health and to screen for a variety of disorders, such as anemia or leukemia.
  • To diagnose a medical condition. Your doctor may suggest a complete blood count if you're experiencing weakness, fatigue, fever, inflammation, bruising or bleeding. A complete blood count may help diagnose the cause of these signs and symptoms. If your doctor suspects you have an infection, the test can also help confirm that diagnosis.
  • To monitor a medical condition. If you've been diagnosed with a blood disorder that affects blood cell counts, your doctor may use complete blood counts to monitor your condition.
  • To monitor medical treatment. A complete blood count may be used to monitor your health if you're taking medications that may affect blood cell counts.

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