IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Esophageal manometry

Esophageal manometry (muh-NOM-uh-tree) is a test that gauges how well your esophagus works. Your esophagus is the long, muscular tube that connects your throat to your stomach. Esophageal manometry measures the rhythmic muscle contractions (peristalsis) that occur in your esophagus when you swallow. Esophageal manometry also measures the coordination and force exerted by the muscles of your esophagus.

During esophageal manometry, a thin, flexible tube (catheter) that contains sensors is passed through your nose, down your esophagus and into your stomach. Esophageal manometry can be helpful in diagnosing some mostly uncommon disorders that affect your esophagus.


Why it's done Risks How you prepare What you can expect Results

Esophageal manometry is used to evaluate the movement (motility) of food through the esophagus and into the stomach. The test measures how well the circular bands of muscle (sphincters) at the top and bottom of your esophagus open and close, as well as the pressure, strength and pattern of the wave of esophageal muscle contractions that moves food along.

Your doctor may recommend esophageal manometry if you're experiencing symptoms that could be related to an esophageal disorder. Those symptoms may include:

  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia)
  • Pain when swallowing (odynophagia)

Esophageal manometry may be used to help diagnose a number of conditions:

  • Swallowing problems(dysphagia). Swallowing problems are more likely to be caused by such things as blockages, narrowing (strictures) or inflammation than by motility issues, so those causes should be ruled out by other tests before resorting to manometry. Diffuse esophageal spasm is a rare swallowing problem that can be identified by manometry. It is defined by multiple, forceful, poorly coordinated muscle contractions of your esophagus.
  • Achalasia. This uncommon condition occurs when your lower esophageal muscle (sphincter) doesn't relax properly to let food enter your stomach. Muscles in the wall of your esophagus are often weak as well. This can cause difficulty swallowing and regurgitation of food back up into your throat.
  • Scleroderma. In many people with this rare progressive disease, the muscles in the lower esophagus cease to move, leading to severe gastroesophageal reflux.

If you're considering undergoing anti-reflux surgery to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), esophageal manometry may be recommended to make sure you don't have achalasia or spasm, which won't be helped by GERD surgery.

If you have chest pain not related to your heart, esophageal manometry is generally only recommended if you've had an endoscopy, GERD has been ruled out and you have some swallowing issues


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