IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Group B strep test

Group B streptococcus — also called group B strep — is a common bacterium often carried in the intestines or lower genital tract. Although group B strep is usually harmless in adults, it can cause complications during pregnancy and serious illness in newborns. If you're pregnant, your health care provider will likely recommend a group B strep test during the third trimester.

During a group B strep test, your health care provider will swab your vagina and rectum and send the samples to a lab for testing. In some cases, you might be given instructions on how to collect the samples yourself. Because you can test positive at certain times and negative at other times, you'll need to repeat the group B strep test each time you're pregnant.

If the group B strep test is negative, no action is needed. If the group B strep test is positive, you'll be given antibiotics during labor to prevent group B strep disease in your baby.


Why it's done How you prepare What you can expect Results

The group B strep test is done during pregnancy to identify women who carry this common bacterium.

Group B strep is usually harmless in adults. Rarely, however, group B strep can cause health problems during pregnancy, including:

  • Urinary tract infection
  • Infection of the placenta and amniotic fluid (chorioamnionitis)
  • Bacteria in the blood (bacteremia)
  • Life-threatening infection in the blood (sepsis)

Rarely, group B strep can contribute to inflammation and infection of the membrane lining the uterus (endometritis) after delivery. Group B strep also increases the risk of wound infection after a C-section.

The primary concern with group B strep, however, is the risk to the baby.

Group B strep can spread to the baby during a vaginal delivery if the baby is exposed to fluids containing the bacterium. While only a few babies who are exposed to group B step develop an infection, those who are infected could develop life-threatening complications — often shortly after birth, but sometimes days or even months later.

Complications for the baby could include:

  • Inflammation of the lungs (pneumonia)
  • Inflammation of the membranes and fluid surrounding the brain and spinal cord (meningitis)
  • Bacteria in the blood (bacteremia)
  • Life-threatening infection in the blood (sepsis)

If you have group B strep, treatment with antibiotics during labor will be recommended to destroy bacteria in the birth canal and reduce your baby's risk of developing an infection. Taking antibiotics before labor doesn't help since the bacteria can grow back quickly.

If you previously gave birth to a baby who had a group B strep infection or you had a urinary tract infection caused by group B strep during your current pregnancy, you're at higher risk of spreading group B strep to your baby. As a result, you'll automatically be treated with antibiotics during labor — making a group B strep test unnecessary.

Antibiotics aren't necessary if you're having a planned C-section, as long as labor hasn't begun and the amniotic sac — the fluid-filled membrane that surrounds and cushions your baby during pregnancy — is intact. Testing is still important, however, since labor could begin naturally before the scheduled C-section.


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