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Microalbumin test

A urine microalbumin test is a test to detect very small levels of a blood protein (albumin) in your urine. A microalbumin test is used to detect early signs of kidney damage in people who have a risk of kidney disease.

Healthy kidneys filter waste from your blood and keep the healthy components, such as proteins like albumin. Kidney damage can cause proteins to leak through your kidneys and leave your body in your urine. Albumin (al-BYOO-min) is one of the first proteins to leak when kidneys become damaged.

Microalbumin tests are recommended for people with an increased risk of kidney disease, such as those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure.


Why it's done How you prepare What you can expect Results

Your doctor may recommend a urine microalbumin test to detect early signs of kidney damage. Treatment for early kidney damage may prevent or delay more advanced kidney disease.

How often you need microalbumin tests depends on any underlying conditions and your risk of kidney damage. For example:

  • Type 1 diabetes. If you have type 1 diabetes, your doctor may recommend a microalbumin test once a year beginning five years after your diagnosis.
  • Type 2 diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes, your doctor may recommend a microalbumin test once a year beginning immediately after your diagnosis.
  • High blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may recommend regular microalbumin tests. Discuss with your doctor how often to repeat this test.

If your urinary microalbumin level is elevated, your doctor may recommend more frequent testing.


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