Open prostatectomy

Open simple prostatectomy is a surgery used to relieve urinary symptoms caused by an enlarged prostate, a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Open simple prostatectomy is generally recommended for men who have severe urinary symptoms and very enlarged prostates. The surgery does not remove the entire prostate, as is done in a prostate cancer operation, but removes just the obstructive part of the prostate that blocks the flow of urine.

During open simple prostatectomy, the part of your prostate blocking urine flow is removed through a cut (incision) below your navel. It may be done by making several smaller incisions in the abdomen through a technique called laparoscopy or with the assistance of a robot to accomplish the same thing.

Why it's done Risks How you prepare What you can expect Results

Open simple prostatectomy eases urinary symptoms and complications resulting from blocked urine flow. These can include:

  • A frequent, urgent need to urinate
  • Difficulty starting urination
  • Slow (prolonged) urination
  • Increased frequency of urination at night (nocturia)
  • Stopping and starting again while urinating
  • The feeling you can't completely empty your bladder
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Inability to urinate

Open simple prostatectomy may also be done to treat or prevent complications due to blocked urine flow, such as:

  • Recurring or persistent urinary tract infections
  • Kidney or bladder damage
  • Inability to control urination (incontinence)
  • Recurring blood in your urine
  • Bladder stones

Because open simple prostatectomy has a higher risk of complications and a longer recovery time than other procedures, it is typically reserved for men who have:

  • A very enlarged prostate
  • Bladder problems or other problems that can also be repaired during surgery
  • Bladder stones
  • Severe bleeding (hemorrhage) from the prostate

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