As per GOI’s circular on price-capping of stents by NPPA(National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority), new prices of coronary stents have been implemented effective 14th February, 2017. For details on stent pricing, across our hospitals. CLICK HERE

Spermicide

Spermicide is a substance that contains chemicals, such as nonoxynol-9, that immobilize or kill sperm. Spermicide is put into the vagina before sex to prevent sperm from entering the uterus. Spermicide is available without a prescription and comes in many forms, including cream, gel, foam, film, suppository and tablet.

Spermicide isn't a highly effective birth control method when used alone. However, spermicide can also be used with a barrier method — such as a condom, diaphragm or cervical cap — to prevent pregnancy. Spermicide doesn't offer protection from sexually transmitted infections.


Why it's done Risks How you prepare What you can expect

Spermicide is a contraceptive substance that can help prevent pregnancy. Spermicide:

  • Can be used alone or with a barrier method, such as a condom, diaphragm, contraceptive sponge or cervical cap
  • Doesn't require partner cooperation
  • Doesn't require a prescription
  • Doesn't have the same side effects as hormone-based birth control methods
  • Increases lubrication during sex

Spermicide isn't appropriate for everyone, however. Your health care provider may discourage use of spermicide if:

  • You're at high risk of contracting HIV or you have HIV or AIDS
  • You have frequent urinary tract infections
  • You're at high risk of pregnancy — you're younger than age 30, you have sex three or more times a week, or you're not likely to consistently use spermicide

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