IMPORTANT NOTICE: At Fortis Healthcare, we are fully supportive of the National priorities set out by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India. Further to the directives of the Government provided in their press release dated 8th Nov 2016, payments at Government hospitals can be made through 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes. In view of the hardship being caused to the large number of patients at private hospitals, we have made an urgent representation to the Government that this exemption should apply equally, for payments, at private hospitals. We are following up with the authorities and hope the Government will step in quickly to resolve this anomaly. Meanwhile, at Fortis hospitals across the country, we continue to accept payments through credit card, debit card and electronic banking transfers. As 500 and 1000 Rupee denomination notes are no longer legal tender we are only accepting 100 Rs and lower currency notes. As per Government regulation, a PAN card and legitimate ID proof is however required for payments in cash exceeding Rs 50,000. Meanwhile we continue to ensure that emergency cases get immediate medical attention without delay whatsoever and have put in more administrative staff and help desks to assist patients.

Tonsillectomy

Tonsillectomy (ton-sih-LEK-tuh-me) is the surgical removal of the tonsils, two oval-shaped pads of tissue at the back of the throat — one tonsil on each side.

A tonsillectomy was once a common procedure to treat infection and inflammation of the tonsils (tonsillitis). Today, a tonsillectomy is usually performed for sleep-disordered breathing but may still be a treatment when tonsillitis occurs frequently or doesn't respond to other treatments.

A tonsillectomy may also be necessary to treat breathing and other problems related to enlarged tonsils and to treat rare diseases of the tonsils.

Recovery time for a tonsillectomy is usually at least 10 days to two weeks.


Why it's done Risks How you prepare What you can expect

A tonsillectomy is used to treat:

  • Recurring, chronic or severe tonsillitis
  • Complications of enlarged tonsils
  • Other rare diseases of the tonsils

Tonsillitis

Tonsils produce certain types of disease-fighting white blood cells. Therefore, the tonsils are believed to act as the immune system's first line of defense against bacteria and viruses that enter your mouth.

This function may make them particularly vulnerable to infection and inflammation. The problem is more common in children because the immune system function of tonsils is most active before puberty. Also, unlike an adult's immune system, a child's system has had less exposure to bacteria and viruses and has yet to develop immunities to them.

A tonsillectomy may be recommended to prevent frequent, recurring episodes of tonsillitis. Frequent is generally defined as:

  • More than seven episodes a year
  • More than five episodes a year in each of the preceding two years
  • More than three episodes a year in each of the preceding three years

The procedure may also be recommended if:

  • A bacterial infection causing tonsillitis doesn't improve with antibiotic treatment
  • An infection that results in a collection of pus behind a tonsil (tonsillar abscess) doesn't improve with drug treatment or a drainage procedure

Complications of enlarged tonsils

Tonsils may become enlarged after frequent or persistent infections, or they may be naturally large. A tonsillectomy may be used to treat the following problems caused or complicated by enlarged tonsils:

  • Difficulty breathing
  • Disrupted breathing during sleep
  • Difficulty swallowing

Other diseases of the tonsils

A tonsillectomy may also be used to treat other rare diseases or conditions of the tonsils, such as:

  • Cancerous tissue in one or both tonsils
  • Recurrent bleeding from blood vessels near the surface of the tonsils

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