All Medical Procedures

Knee osteotomy is a surgical procedure that may be recommended if you have arthritis damage in just one area of your knee. The procedure involves removing or adding a wedge of bone to your upper shinbone (tibia) or lower thighbone (femur) to help shift your body weight off the damaged portion of your knee joint.

Knee osteotomy is most commonly performed on people who may be considered too young for a total knee replacement. Total knee replacements wear out much more quickly in people younger than 55 than in people older than 70.

Many people who undergo knee osteotomy will eventually need a total knee replacement — usually about 10 to 15 years after the knee osteotomy.

Knee replacement surgery — also known as knee arthroplasty (ARTH-row-plas-tee) — can help relieve pain and restore function in severely diseased knee joints. During knee replacement, a surgeon cuts away damaged bone and cartilage from your thighbone, shinbone and kneecap and replaces it with an artificial joint made of metal alloys, high-grade plastics and polymers.

The first artificial knees were little more than crude hinges. Now, you and your doctor can choose from a wide variety of designs that take into account your age, weight, activity level and overall health. Most knee replacement joints attempt to replicate your knee's natural ability to roll and glide as it bends.

Laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) eye surgery is a procedure that corrects certain vision problems, reducing or eliminating the need for eyeglasses or corrective lenses.

LASIK eye surgery is the most common type of refractive surgery. Refractive surgery changes the shape of the dome-shaped transparent tissue (cornea) at the front of your eye.

The desired result of LASIK eye surgery is to bend (refract) light rays to focus more precisely on your retina rather than at some point beyond or short of your retina.

The goal of LASIK eye surgery is to produce clearer, sharper vision.

Labor induction — also known as inducing labor — is a procedure used to stimulate uterine contractions during pregnancy before labor begins on its own. Successful labor induction leads to a vaginal birth. A health care provider might recommend labor induction for various reasons, primarily when there's concern for a mother's health or a baby's health.

Labor induction carries various risks, including infection and the need for a C-section. Sometimes the benefits of labor induction outweigh the risks, however. If you're pregnant, understanding why and how labor induction is done can help you prepare.

Laminectomy is surgery that creates space by removing the lamina — the back part of the vertebra that covers your spinal canal. Also known as decompression surgery, laminectomy enlarges your spinal canal to relieve pressure on the spinal cord or nerves.

This pressure is most commonly caused by bony overgrowths within the spinal canal, which can occur in people who have arthritis in their spines.

Laminectomy is generally used only when more-conservative treatments — such as medication, physical therapy or injections — have failed to relieve symptoms. Laminectomy may also be recommended if symptoms are severe or worsening dramatically.

It is dual restrictive innovative technique which involves gastric greater curvature placation or infolding of the stomach to form a gastric sleeve followed by placement of an adjustable gastric band in the upper part of the stomach.

In this procedure, the size of the stomach is halved to limit the amount of food a person can eat at any one time. This is achieved by folding the stomach wall inward and suturing it (No cutting, no stapling) in 2 layers using  Dr. C.K. Huang’s Gastric plication formula.

It is also known as single anastomosis gastric bypass, in which a long gastric sleeve is created along the lesser curvature and is directly attached to the small intestine after bypassing 150-200 cm of proximal jejunum. It is a simple, safe, rapid and powerful bariatric operation.

Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass is a reversible weight loss procedure. It involves creation of a small, 30 cc pouch from the upper stomach, accompanied by bypass of the remaining stomach. This reduces your appetite and makes you feel satiated with smaller portions. Then the small intestine is divided 60 cm from ligament of Treitz and a Biliopancreatic limb is created. A Roux limb is created using 100cm of small intestine. Reconstruction of GI tract is done to form a Roux-en-Y anastomosis.

This procedure involves surgery on the stomach only and does not involve the intestine. In this procedure, the stomach is reduced permanently to about 20% of its original size, by surgical removal of a large portion of the stomach along the greater curvature. The result is a sleeve or banana like structure. The newer smaller stomach restricts food intake by allowing only a small amount of food to be consumed in a single sitting. It provides quicker satiety (sense of fullness) and decreased appetite because of removal of fundus that produces hunger hormone Ghrelin.